A brush stroke in time – Victor Bellis

Victor Bellis passed on recently. As a friend, I did not know him that well, but I did see a resemblance to my own dad in him. I’m not sure why, because if you compared pictures, you would probably say they didn’t look anything like each other.

On our journeys we come across many other souls, and some of them just for a moment pass through. I once watched cars flowing past me on a highway and wondered what each driver’s journey was about. Victor crossed my path, and others have shared the richness of his life, and I accept the blessing he was in those brief moments we had.

It’s difficult to let go of a loved one, but I like his attitude of telling us to move on – he’ll be waiting for when we take the step he has.

Our lives are peppered by news of every little action others take in their thirst for attention – and the time we spend paying attention is time we’ve lost living our own lives, and touching those around us.

Thank you, Victor, for the opportunity to say hello and how are you. The sound of your voice now echoes in my soul.

Lent – Tuesday week 2

Sometimes I move too quickly from one thing to another, possibly going from one adrenaline rush to the next, rather than focusing on something and digging deeper into it – into the area where it’s no longer easy, no longer exciting (at least on a surface level). So today I will re-visit Sunday’s reflection, or the thoughts behind it. The idea that we need to build ourselves up, grab for all we can, while we can. An opportunity missed is a fortune frittered away.

It reminds me of the Buddhist Mandala, specifically the sand variety, which is brushed away after it has been completed. I think we should remember that nothing is permanent in this world, and the energy used to preserve is sometimes wasted energy, born of a desire to keep things from changing, born from a desire to hold on to something material.

Jesus seemed to me to be all about impermanence. Not taking anything with him. Relying on others for basic needs.

Letting go.

There’s a time to hold on, and a time to let go. Help me understand when my hands and heart should open.